Publications
2003
Egypt: the Giza morbidity study, in Investigating Reproductive Tract Infections and Other Gynaecological Disorders: A Multidisciplinary Research Approach edited by Shireen Jejeebhoy, Michael Koenig, Christopher Elias, Cambridge University Press, 2003.

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Egypt: the Giza morbidity study, in Investigating Reproductive Tract Infections and Other Gynaecological Disorders: A Multidisciplinary Research Approach edited by Shireen Jejeebhoy, Michael Koenig, Christopher Elias, Cambridge University Press, 2003. The objectives of the Giza morbidity study were multidimensional to assess levels of reproductive morbidity in the study community; to test the extent to which an interview questionnaire can provide information on reproductive morbidity; and to delineate the layers of determinants of actual and perceived morbidity. The study, conducted in 1989-91, had a complex data collection strategy, which included an interview questionnaire of several components to be administered over two visits to a household, a clinical examination at the community health centre and laboratory testing at the local health center. A review of the previous studies involving examinations revealed that one of the main obstacles to obtaining credible research results was a low participation rate. Thus, defining the methodology, selecting an appropriate research team and building rapport with the community were central in overcoming the problem of a low participation rate for medical examinations in a resource-poor rural community. The Giza study has recorded an impressive participation rate (91 and 100 per cent in two villages studied), despite the relatively large size of the study sample and the complicated data collection process required; equally impressive rates were observed in follow-up studies in Egypt, Jordan and Lebanon based on virtually identical methodology. The high participation rates achieved in these studies provides a strong rationale for documenting the methodology used by the Giza study to build community rapport. The objective of this case study thus is to draw lessons from the conduct of the Giza study for maximizing participation and building rapport between the study team and the community, particularly women. Maximizing community participation and building rapport requires multi-pronged action, from careful selection of study sites and research team, to support to women to overcome fear and inhibition to participate in the study.
Author(s): Hind Khattab  
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